Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Oil and Gas News from OilGasDaily.Com  

Subscribe free to our newsletters via your

Sponge-like material can store natural gas
by Staff Writers
Pittsburgh PA (SPX) Jan 21, 2016

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering are utilizing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to develop a new type of storage system that would adsorb natural gas like a sponge and allow for more energy-efficient storage and use. Image courtesy University of Pittsburgh. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Although compressed natural gas represents a cleaner and more efficient fuel for vehicles, its volatile nature requires a reinforced, heavy tank that stores the gas at high pressure and therefore limits vehicle design.

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering are utilizing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to develop a new type of storage system that would adsorb the gas like a sponge and allow for more energy-efficient storage and use.

The research, "Mechanisms of Heat Transfer in Porous Crystals Containing Adsorbed Gases: Applications to Metal-Organic Frameworks," was published this week in the journal Physical Review Letters by Christopher E. Wilmer, assistant professor of chemical and petroleum engineering, and postdoctoral fellow Hasan Babaei. (DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.025902) Traditional CNG tanks are empty structures that require the gas to be stored at high pressure, which affects design and the weight of the vehicle.

Dr. Wilmer and his lab are instead focused on porous crystal/gas systems, specifically MOFs, which possess structures with extremely high surface areas.

"One of the biggest challenges in developing an adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage system is that the process generates significant heat which limits how quickly the tank can be filled," Dr. Wilmer said. "Unfortunately, not a lot is known about how to make adsorbents dissipate heat quickly. This study illuminates some of the fundamental mechanisms involved."

According to Dr. Wilmer, gases have a $500 billion impact on the global economy, but storing, separating, and transporting gas requires energy-intensive compression. His research into MOFs is an extension of his start-up company, NuMat Technologies, which develops MOF-based solutions for the gas storage industry.

"By gaining a better understanding of heat transfer mechanisms at the atomic scale in porous materials, we could develop a more efficient material that would be thermally conductive rather than thermally insulating," he explained.

"Beyond natural gas, these insights could help us design better hydrogen gas storage systems as well. Any industrial process where a gas interacts with a porous material, where heat is an important factor, could potentially benefit from this research."


Related Links
University of Pittsburgh
All About Oil and Gas News at

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
IMF lowers economic forecast for Saudi Arabia
Davos, Switzerland (UPI) Jan 19, 2016
The economy of oil-rich Saudi Arabia is expected to face growth restrictions at least for the next two years, the International Monetary Fund said. The IMF said in an update to its seminal World Economic Outlook Saudi Arabia's economy will slow from 3.4 percent growth last year to 1.2 percent in 2016 and 1.9 percent next year. Globally, the IMF said developing economies declined for the ... read more

China 2015 electricity output down 0.2 percent

War Between Saudi Arabia And Iran Could Send Oil Prices To $250

ChemChina buys stake in Swiss energy trader Mercuria

Australian farmers to benefit from renewables boost

Fuel cell advance

Abu Dhabi promotes new energy business opportunities

Creation of Jupiter interior, a step towards room temp superconductivity

Superoxide gives lithium-air batteries a jolt

One-stop shop for biofuels

BESC study seeks nature's best biocatalysts for biofuel production

Preventing food waste better strategy than turning it into biogas

Second-generation biofuels can reduce emissions

Belgium fails to reassure Luxembourg over nuclear safety: official

IAEA Starts Assessment of Japan's Efforts on Safe Use of Nuclear Plants

Japan to send plutonium cache to US under nuclear deal: report

Graphene filter can clean nuclear wastewater

Growth rings on rocks give up North American climate secrets

Drought, heat slash grain crops: study

Earth's recent history key to predicting global temperatures

Russia 'warming 2.5 times quicker' than global average

Ghost town tests self-driving cars of tomorrow

Renault shares keep on skidding on emission fears

Renault recalls vehicles amid failed emissions test

Daimler Trucks eyes swift return to post-sanctions Iran

US and Iraq search for Americans kidnapped in Baghdad

US and Iraq search for Americans kidnapped in Baghdad

US-led military campaign focusing on Raqa, Mosul: Pentagon chief

Two Iraqi journalists shot dead, intel officer wounded


Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.